NACCHO Aboriginal Sexual Health Alert: Addressing structural challenges for the sexual health and well-being of Indigenous women

Posted on 18/02/2016 by admin

“Indigenous women and their children need health equity and societal equality. This can be achieved by redressing structural and systemic barriers to quality services, and working together to realise human rights for all Australians.”

This gap in life expectancy and health equity is but one indicator of a loss of elementary human rights. The other is in the numbers of our people living a socially functional life and those living a life of pain, humiliation and dysfunction. Thus, human rights frameworks need to inform a broadening of service-led and community-led responses to the current epidemic rates of sexually transmitted infections, HIV and hepatitis C, particularly among those injecting drugs, and to address trauma related to sexual assault, sexual abuse and intimate domestic violence.”

Professor Kerry Arabena, Centre for Health Equity, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne.

Exert from NACCHO Alert

“This gap in life expectancy and health equity is but one indicator of a loss of elementary human rights. The other is in the numbers of our people living a socially functional life and those living a life of pain, humiliation and dysfunction. Thus, human rights frameworks need to inform a broadening of service-led and community-led responses to the current epidemic rates of sexually transmitted infections, HIV and hepatitis C, particularly among those injecting drugs, and to address trauma related to sexual assault, sexual abuse and intimate domestic violence. The current inequitable situation is not congruent with the rights and responsibilities framework advocated for by Indigenous Australians to enjoy and control their sexual and reproductive behaviour in line with their cultural values, kinship practices and ethics; to be free of diseases that are treatable or preventable; and to have no fear, shame, guilt and myths about their sexuality and sexual relationships.”

To read the full NACCHO Alert, click here.

To read the full publication, click here.